eae

VOLUME I0 PART 2

NORTH AMERICAN FLORA

(AGARICALES)

AGARICACEAE (pars) AGARICEAE (pats)

VY WiLLiAM ALPHONSO MURRILL

PUBLISHED BY

THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN

APRIL, 26, 1917

je

ANNOUNCEMENT

NortH AMERICAN FLoRA is designed to present in one work de- scriptions of all plants growing, independent of cultivation, in North America, here taken to include Greenland, Central America, the Republic of Panama, and the West Indies, except Trinidad, Tobago, and Curacao and other islands off the north coast of Venezuela, whose flora is essentially South American.

The work will be published in parts at irregular intervals, by the New York Botanical Garden, through the aid of the income of the David Lydig Fund bequeathed by Charles P. Daly.

It is planned to issue parts as rapidly as they can be prepared, the ex- tent of the work making it possible to commence publication at any number of points. ‘The completed work will form a series of volumes with the following sequence :

Volume 1. Myxomycetes, Schizophyta, Diatomaceae.

Volumes 2 to 10. Fungi.

Volumes 11 to 13. Algae.

Volumes 14 and 15. Bryophyta.

Volume 16. Pteridophyta and Gymnospermae.

Volumes 17 to 19.. Monocotyledones.

Volumes 20 to 34. Dicotyledones.

The preparation of the work has been referred by the Scientific Direc- tors of the Garden to a committee consisting of Dr. N. L. Britton, Dr. W. A. Murrill, and Dr. J. H. Barnhart.

Professor George F. Atkinson, of Cornell University ; Professor John M. Coulter, of the University of Chicago; Mr. Frederick V. Coville, of the United . States Department of Agriculture; Professor Byron D. Halsted, of Rutgers College ; and Professor William Trelease, of the University of Illinois, have consented to act as an advisory committee.

Each author will be wholly responsible for his own contributions, being restricted only by the general style adopted for the work, which must vary somewhat in the treatment of diverse groups.

The subscription price is fixed at $1.50 for each part; it is expected that four or five parts will be required for each volume. A limited number of separate parts will be sold at $2.00 each. Address:

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Part 2, 1917] AGARICACEAE 77

Amanita elliptosperma Atk. Ann. Myc. 7: 336. 1909. Described from Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Resembling white forms of Venenarius phalloides, but said to have ellipsoid spores.

Amanita elongata Peck, Bull. N. Y. State Mus. 131: 33. 1909. Described from speci- mens collected by Sterling in Pennsylvania, July, 1907, on damp grassy ground in the borders of woods. Resembling Vaginata albocreata, but having a well-developed annulus. From yel- low forms of Venenarius phalloides, it differs in its very long, slender stipe and the absence of a free limb to the volva. In color and general appearance, except the long stipe, it greatly resembles Venenarius Frostianus. Further field studies are highly desirable.

Lepiota gemmata Morgan, Jour. Myc. 12: 202. 1906. Collected near Preston, Ohio, on rich soil or rotten wood. Probably a form of Venenarius solitarius.

Amanita junquillea Quél. Bull. Soc. Bot. Fr. 23: 324. pl. 3, f. 10. 1876. Held by some to be equivalent to Venenarius russuloides, but there seems to be little foundation for this opinion.

Amanita magnivelaris Peck, Ann. Rep. N. Y. State Mus. 50:96. 1898. Described from Port Jefferson, New York, and said by the author to differ from. Amanita verna in its large, persistent annulus; its elongate, downwardly tapering bulb; and especially in its ellipsoid spores. .

Amanita mappa Fries, Epicr. Myc. 6. 1838.

Agaricus pantherinus DC. Fl. Fr. 6:52. 1815. Venenarius pantherinus Murrill, Myco- logia 5: 80. 1913. Described from France, and found in woods and groves throughout Europe and parts of Asia. I have been unable to find any typical specimens from this country. In the case of V. phalloides, we have white and dark forms abundantly represented, and it would seem natural to expect the dark forms of V. pantherinus also if the species occurs here. Beardslee has studied V. cothurnatus in North Carolina and V. pantherinus in Sweden, and he believes the two to be identical. He found the spores of both species to be globose in fresh specimens, changing to ellipsoid after the dried plants were kept for several weeks. Amanita umbrina Pers. Syn. Fung. 254. 1801 refers to the usual dark European form of this species. DeCandolle evidently did not use Persoon’s name in Agaricus because it was preoccupied in that genus.

Amanita submaculata Peck, Bull. Torrey Club 27: 609. 1900. Known only from a single specimen, accompanied by a sketch, sent to Dr. Peck from North Carolina by Miss Wilson, who, pronouncing it edible, must have collected more than one hymenophore. If it had not been pronounced edible, I should be inclined to classify it as a dark-centered form of Venenarius phalloides, in which most of the volva had been carried up on the surface of the cap. The type is sterile, and further field study of the plant is highly desirable.

Agaricus virosus Fries, Epicr. Myc. 6. 1838. This species has often been confused with white forms of Venenarius phalloides, from which it is said to differ in its strong odor and rough stipe.

Subtribe 2, PLUTEANAE*

Pileus irregular, dimidiate or resupinate. 52. CLAUDOPUS. Pileus regular, sometimes eccentric in Pleuropus. Volva and annulus wanting. Stipe cartilaginous. Margin of pileus incurved when young.

Lamellae decurrent. 53. Eccinia.

Lamellae adnate or adnexed. 54. LEPTONIELLA. Margin of pileus straight and appressed when young; lamellae free or

adnexed. 55. NOLANEA. Stipe fleshy. .

Lamellae decurrent, rarely varying to adnate. 56. PLEUROPUS. Lamellae sinuate or adnexed.

Spores not angular, rosy-ochraceous in mass. 57, LePISTA.

Spores angular, rose-colored in mass. 58. ENTOLOMA, Lamellae free. 59. PLUTEUS. Volva wanting, annulus present. 60. CHAMAEOTA. Volva present, annulus wanting. 61. VoLvaRiopsis, * See N. Am. Flora 9: 237 for a key to the four subtribes of the Agariceae. The

Pluteanae are distinguished by their spores, which are rosy or rosy-ochraceous in mass and often angular in outline.

78 NORTH AMERICAN FLORA [Vo_umE 10

52. CLAUDOPUS (W. G. Smith) Gill. Champ. Fr. 426. 1876.

Agaricus § Claddopus W. G. Smith, Clavis Agar. 17, 1870. Dochmiopus Pat. Hymén. Eur. 113. 1887. Octojuga Fayod, Ann. Sci. Nat. VII. 9: 390. 1889.

Pileus fleshy, putrescent, irregular, dimidiate or resupinate; spores pink or salmon-colored; stipe lateral or wanting, rarely eccentric; veil none. Type species, Claudopus variabilis (Pers.) Gill.

Pileus pure-white, unchanging with age. Pileus 1-4 mm. broad. Pileus 1-2.5 cm. broad. Pileus white or whitish, becoming pinkish or grayish, 1-2.5 cm. broad. Pileus greenish-white when young, dull-white or yellowish-white when old, 2.5-5 em, broad. Pileus bright-yellow or bright-tawny-orange. Pileus reaching 2 cm. broad; spores globose. Pileus reaching 5 em. broad; spores curved-rod-shaped. Pileus gray, grayish-cinnamon, avellaneous, or brown. Pileus pale-avellaneous; stipe grayish, 5 mm. long. Pileus differently colored; stipe shorter. Pileus grayish-cinnamon. Pileus grayish-brown.

. C. subdepluens. . C. multiformis. . C. depluens.

. C. mephiticus.

. C. subnidulans. C. nidulans.

. C. avellaneus.

. Cy. greigensis. . C, byssoideus.

wo ms nn Sm Ghee

H. 1. Claudopus subdepluens,M. Fitzpatrick, Mycologia 7: 37. 1915. Pileus convex to expanded, minute, 1-4 mm. broad; surface white, minutely tomentose, margin sulcate; lamellae at first white, becoming salmon-colored, distant, adnate, entire on the edges; spores angular, uniguttulate, rarely 2-guttulate, rose-colored, 7-12 X 6-8 uw; stipe white, lateral, flexible, about 2 mm. long, not more than 0.5 mm. thick. Typk LocaLity: Six Mile Gorge, Ithaca, New York.

Hasitat: Parasitic on Coltricia perennis. DistRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

2. Claudopus multiformis Murrill. Agaricus variabilis Pers. Obs. Myc. 2: 46. 1799. Not A. variabilis Batsch, 1783. Claudopus variabilis Gill. Champ. Fr. 426. 1876. Pileus fleshy, resupinate to reflexed, 1-2.5 cm. broad; surface white, smooth, tomentose; lamellae distant, broad, white to red; spores ellipsoid, pale-red, 6-7 X 2.5—4 u; stipe eccentric

or wanting, short, incurved, villose.

Type LOCALITY: Europe.

Hasitat: On decayed wood, usually spruce.

DISTRIBUTION: Massachusetts and North Carolina; also in Europe.

Inzusrrations: Cooke, Brit. Fungi pl. 344a (371); Gill. Champ. Fr. pl. 286 (95); Hussey, Il. Brit. Myc. 1: pl. 50; Pat. Tab. Fung. 1: f. 225, 226; Pers. Obs. Myc. 2: pl. 5, f. 12.

Exsiccati: Romell, Fungi Scand. 108 (as C. sessilis); Roum. Fungi Gall. 2606; Thiim. Myc. Univ. 401; Westend, & Wall. Herb. Crypt. 1283.

3. Claudopus depluens (Batsch) Gill. Champ. Fr. 427. 1876.

Agaricus depluens Batsch, Elench. Fung. Contin. 1: 167. 1786. Agaricus epigaeus Pers. Obs. Myc. 2: 47. 1799.

Pileus thin, at first resupinate, becoming reflexed, variable in form, sessile or with a short stipe, 1-2.5 em. broad; surface slightly silky-tomentose, especially toward the base, white or whitish, becoming pink or sometimes tinged with red or gray; lamellae broad, subdistant, whitish, becoming pink; spores angular, usually containing a single large nucleus, 10-11 X 7.5 pu.

Type Locality: Bavaria. HasitaT: On moist shaded ground or among mosses, sometimes on dead wood or sawdust. DistRIBUTION: New York to South Carolina in the eastern United States; also in Europe. - are Crema Batsch, Elench. Fung. f. 122; Cooke, Brit. Fungi pl. 3446 (371); Pat. Tab. ‘ung. f. : Exsiccati: Sydow, Myc. Mar. 4002.

4. Claudopus mephiticus Murrill, Mycologia 7:7290. 1915.

Pileus eccentric, convex to nearly plane, somewhat depressed at the center, cespitose, 2.5-5 cm. broad; surface dry, glabrous, slightly concentrically sulcate, greenish-white when

Part 2, 1917] AGARICACEAE 79

young, dull-white or yellowish-white when old, margin concolorous, undulate; context white, with a very decided mephitic or garlic odor and taste; lamellae sinuate, subdistant, broad, slightly serrate on the edges, white, becoming rose-colored at maturity; spores angular, rose- colored, uniguttulate, 9 X 7 u; stipe short, subcylindric, very eccentric, solid, pruinose, white, 1-1.5 cm. long, 4-6 mm. thick.

Type LocaLity: Minnehaha Park, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Hastrat: On fallen dead branches. DistTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

5. Claudopus subnidulans Overholts, Ann. Mo. Bot. Gard. 3: 195. 1916.

Pileus sessile, reniform or dimidiate in outline, convex, 0.5-2 em. broad; surface dry, fibrillose-tomentose, bright-tawny-orange, margin inrolled, even or slightly striate; context thin, white, the odor and taste none; lamellae radiating from the point of attachment to the pileus, of medium distance, rather broad, 3-5 mm., salmon-colored or dull-orange; spores globose, smooth salmon-colored, 5-7 y; stipe none, the pileus attached by a white, tomentose base.

TYPE LocaLity: Jefferson Barracks, near St. Louis, Missouri. Hasrrat: On rotten logs in damp woods. DisTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

6. Claudopus nidulans (Pers.) P. Karst. Bidr. Finl. Nat. Folk

32: 288. 1879. Agaricus nidulans Pers. Ic. Descr. Fung. 19. 1798. Agaricus dorsalis Bosc, Ges. Nat. Freunde Berlin Mag. 5: 85. 1811.

Pileus sessile or narrowed to a very short stipe, reniform to circular, usually imbricate, reaching 5 cm. or more broad; surface dry, tomentose or somewhat hirsute, bright-yellow, margin involute; context slightly tough; spores minute and very peculiar, resembling some bacteria, curved-rod-shaped, smooth, rose-colored in mass, 3~5 X 1 uy.

TYPE LocaLity: Europe. .

Hastrat: On decaying wood of both deciduous and coniferous trees.

DIstRiBUTION: Canada to Florida and west to Oregon; also in Europe.

InL,ustrations: Atk. Stud. Am. Fungi ed. 1. f. 141; ed. 2. f. 144; Ges. Nat. Freunde Berlin Mag. 5: £1. 4; Mycologia 6: pl. 113, f. 6; Pers. Ic. Deser. Fung. 1. 6, f. 4

f. 4. Exsiccatr: Ellis, N. Am. Fungi 913 (as Panus dorsalis); Rav. Fungi Am. 103; Rav. Fungi Car. 1:5 (as Panus foetens); 2: 13; Roum. Fungi Sel. 6769.

7. Claudopus avellaneus Murrill, sp. nov.

Pileus thin, very eccentric, convex, depressed behind, gregarious, 1 cm. broad; surface smooth, finely tomentose, pale-avellaneous, margin very thin, concolorous, inflexed; lamellae aduate, broad, distant, white to salmon-colored, entire and concolorous on the edges; spores ovoid, irregular, angular, apictlate, uniguttulate, rose-colored, 8-10 X 5-6; stipe short, much enlarged above, smooth, grayish, densely tomentose, about 5 mm. long, 1-2 mm. thick.

Type collected on dead wood at Glen Brook, Oregon, November 7, 1911, W. A. Murrill 779

(herb. N. Y. Bot. Gard.). . DISTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

8. Claudopus greigensis (Peck) Sacc. Syll. Fung. 5: 735. 1887.

Agaricus greigensis Peck, Ann. Rep. N. Y. State Mus. 24: 69. 1872.

Pileus very thin, convex, 1-2 cm. broad; surface hygrophanous, grayish-cinnamon and striatulate wityn moist, silky-fibrillose when dry; lamellae subdistant, scarcely reaching the stipe, grayish, becoming dingy-pink; spores angular, usually containing a single large nucleus, 8.5-11 X 7.5 uw; stipe short, solid, curved, fibrillose below, with an abundant white, radiating mycelium at the base, about 2 mm. long.

Type LOCALITY: Greig, New York. Hasrrat: On much decayed wood. DIstRIBUTION: New York.

80 NORTH AMERICAN FLORA [VorumE 10

9. Claudopus byssoideus (Pers.) Murrill.

Agaricus byssoideus Pers. Ic. Deser. Fung. 56. 1800. Agaricus byssisedus Pers, Syn. Fung. 482. 1801. Claudopus byssisedus Gill. Champ. Fr. 427, 1876.

Pileus very thin, at first resupinate, becoming reflexed, nearly plane, 1-2 cm. broad; surface glabrous or merely pruinose with a slight grayish villosity, gray, grayish-brown, or brown; lamellae rather broad, subdecurrent, grayish, becoming tinged with pink; spores angular, 10-11 x 7.5 4; stipe short, lateral or eccentric, generally curved, with white, radiating,

byssoid fibrils at the base. Tyre LocaLity: Europe. Hasirat: On decaying wood. DistRIBUTION: New York and Pennsylvania; also in Europe. : ae aguas Cooke, Brit. Fungi pl. 344c (371); Pat. Tab. Fung.f. 432; Pers. Ic. Descr. Fung. pl. 14, f. 4. Exsiccat1: Sydow, Myc. Mar, 2301.

53. ECCILIA (Fries) Quél. Champ. Jura Vosg. 90. 1872.

Agaricus § Eccilia Fries, Syst. Myc. 1: 207. 1821. Hyporhodimus Schroet. Krypt.-Fl. Schles. 3!: 613. 1889.

Pileus thin, fleshy, putrescent, the margin at first incurved; lamellae decurrent; spores pink or salmon-colored, usually angular; stipe central, slender, tubular, with cartilaginous cortex; veil none.

Type species, Eccilia atrides (Lasch) Quél.

I. SPECIES OCCURRING IN TEMPERATE NORTH AMERICA, EXCEPT THOSE CONFINED TO THE . : Pacific coast Pileus white.

Stipe 2.5-3.5 em. long. 1. E. nivea. |, stipe 4-6 cm. long. 2. E. roseoalbocitrina. Pileus yellowish-white. 3. E. cinericola Pileus pale-yellow. 4. E. favida ; Pileus ee or yellowish-brown, 1-2.5 em. broad. aariee : Lamellae narrow. ifoli. Tenelice bread, 5. E. angustifolia. Pileus dark-isabelline, pale-chestnut on drying. i Pileus yellowish-brown, brownish-orange on aryiigs ¢. & sil ies be Pileus dull-reddish-brown, 2~5 cm. broad. 3 E. mordax. Pileus mouse-colored. aN . hited = eat pee - E, pentagonospora. Pileus grayish-brown or avellaneous. aes. Pileus 1 cm. broad. Pileus 4—6 cm. broad. ee e ee Hes dark-brown or blackish. ee dah a tipe green. ; Stipe brownish or blackish. br Eee ONSEN. Lamellae blackish on the edges. Pileus 2-2.5 em. broad; stipe 2 mm. or less thick. ied Pileus 2,5—3.5 cm. broad; stipe 2-4 mm. thick. es a et alas Lamellae not blackish on the edges. ee EES Sah: nee thick. tipe 2.5 cm, long. 16, E. Watsoni _ Stipe 3.5-5 cm. long. 17. E. sphagnophila Stipe 5-6 mm. thick. 18. E. pyrina . Il. SPECIES CONFINED To THE PACIFIC COAST SHpe : 5-3 em, long; pileus etree dail or blackish. jleus grayish-brown, reaching 2.5 cm. broad. p 7 Pileus grayish-black, reaching 3.5 cm. broad. a6 : = oe Stipe 4-6 em. long; pileus dark-lavender. 21. E. Y cea TII. Spxecr#s CONFINED To TROPICAL NorTH AMERICA Pileus tan-colored. Pileus 1 cm. broad; stipe 2 em, long. z Pileus 2 cm. broad; stipe 4 cm. long. oe epialad Pileus pale-blue. 24. F. ae a Pileus blackish. 25. Ez. beens 4, as.

Part 2, 1917] AGARICACEAE 81

1. Eccilia nivea Peck, Ann. Rep. N. Y. State Mus. 49: 18. 1897. Eccilia subacus Peck, Bull. Torrey Club 34: 100. 1907.

Pileus thin, submembranous, hemispheric or very convex, slightly umbilicate, 1-2.5 cm. broad; surface smooth, finely appressed-fibrillose, white; lamellae thin, rather broad, distant, arcuate, short-decurrent, white, becoming salmon-colored; spores ellipsoid, angular, tni- guttulate, rose-colored, 10-12 X 6-8 y; stipe slender, fragile, equal or slightly tapering upward, glabrous, stuffed or hollow, white, 2~5 cm. long, 1-2 mm. thick.

TYPE LocaLity: Selkirk, New York.

Hapirat: On the ground ia woods or thickets. DISTRIBUTION: New England and New York.

2. Eccilia roseoalbocitrina Atk. Ann. Myc. 7: 369. 1909.

Pileus strongly convex when young, slightly depressed at the center, becoming expanded with the margin strongly upturned with age, thin, 1-2.5 cm. broad; surface minutely silky with loose, delicate threads, smooth, entirely white, sometimes faintly tinged with yellow at the center; lamellae at first white, then pale-rose-colored or becoming buff on drying, adnate or decurrent, subdistant, slightly ventricose; spores elongate, angular, pale-flesh-colored, 9-11 X 6-9 yu; stipe smooth, hollow, cartilaginous, covered with «a delicate, white, velvety tomentum when young, the apex mealy, with tufts of clavate cells when old, 4-6 cm. long, 2-3.5 mm. thick.

TYPE Locality: Cayuga Lake, Ithaca, New York.

Hasitat: On the ground. Distrisution: Known only from the type locality.

3. Eccilia cinericola Peck, Bull. Torrey Club 34: 347. 1907.

Pileus thin, fragile, broadly convex, becoming expanded and broadly umbilicate or cen- trally depressed, 1.2-2.5 cm. broad; surface glabrous, slightly scabrous, white tinged with yellow, becoming cream-colored with age; lamellae thick, distant, broad, adnate or slightly decurrent, sometimes slightly sinuate, white, becoming pink, dusted with the spores; spores subglobose, angular, 10-12 X 8-10 yp; stipe subcartilaginous, fragile, hollow, slightly enlarged at the apex, white at first, becoming colored like the pileus, 2-2.5 em. long, 2 mm. thick.

TYPE LOCALITY: Boston, Massachusetts.

Hasrrat: Gravelly ground among grasses, especially where coal ashes have been lying for a

long time. Distr1puTIoN: Known only from the type locality.

4. Eccilia flavida Peck, Bull. Torrey Club 36: 153. 1909.

Pileus thin, convex, umbilicate, 2-2.5 cm. broad; surface glabrous, pale-yellow, obscurely striate when dry; lamellae thin, somewhat crowded, decurrent; spores subglobose, angular, 8-12 X 6-8 uw; stipe slender, glabrous, hollow, concolorous or a little paler, commonly with white mycelium at the base, 2.5-3.5 cm. long, 1.5-2 mm. thick.

TyPE LOCALITY: Stow, Massachusetts.

DISTRIBUTION: Vicinity of Stow, Massachusetts.

5. Eccilia angustifolia Murrill, sp. nov.

Pileus thin, regular, convex-umbilicate, not expanding, solitary, 1.5-2 cm. broad; surface glabrous, uniformly tan-colored, pale-chestnut in dried specimen, striate, margin entire, concolorous; lamellae short-decurrent, subdistant, narrow, several times inserted, white to salmon-colored, entire and concolorous on the edges; spores broadly ellipsoid, angular, obliquely apiculate, rose-colored, 10.5 X 9 nu; stipe long, slender, eqifal, smooth, glabrous, solid, pale- fuliginous, 4-5 cm. long, reaching 2 mm. thick.

Type collected on the ground in moss at West Park, New York, August 9, 1903, F. S. Earle

1832 (herb. N. Y. Bot. Gard.). : DISTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

82 NORTH AMERICAN FLORA [VoLuME 10

6. Eccilia tenuipes Murrill, sp. nov.

Pileus convex-umbilicate, regular in shape, gregarious, 1.5 cm. broad; surface glabrous, tan-colored, pale-chestnut in dried specimens, margin concolorous, entire, deeply striate; lamellae rather broad, ‘subcrowded, decurrent, pallid to salmon-colored, concolorous and entire on the edges; spores ellipsoid, angular, obliquely apiculate, rose-colored, 10-12.5 XK 6-8 4; stipe long and slender, tubular, equal, smooth, glabrous, concolorous, 6 cm. long, 1 mm. thick.

‘Lype collected on the ground in oak woods at Bound Brook, New Jersey, July 6, 1903, F. S. Earle 1466 (herb. N. Y. Bot. Gard.). ; DistRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

7. Eccilia unicolor Peck, Bull. Torrey Club 34: 99. 1907.

Pileus thin, submembranous, conic or very convex, becoming expanded, umbilicate, 1-2.5 em. broad; surface glabrous, silky, shining, hygrophanous, yellowish-brown and striatu- late on the margin when moist, becoming paler or brownish-orange on drying; lamellae un- equal, thin, narrow, crowded, arcuate, decurrent, sometimes serrate on the edges, concolorous; spores angular, uniguttulate, 8-12 X 6-8 yu; stipe externally cartilaginous, straight or flexuous, glabrous, shining, stuffed, pruinose at the apex, concolorous or a little paler, with a whitish, mycelioid tomentum at the base, 3-6 cm. long, 1-3 mm. thick.

Typs LocaLity: Falmouth, Massachusetts. Hasirat: Gravelly soil in waste places. . DistRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

8. Eccilia mordax Atk. Jour. Myc. 8: 113. 1902.

Pileus convex, umbilicate, usually gregarious, 2-5 cm. broad; surface smooth, dull-reddish- brown or pale-chestnut-colored, hygrophanous, tough, rarely cracking radially, margin in- rolled; context thin, dirty-white, the taste at first not marked, but after 15 or 20 minutes leaving a burning sensation in the throat which often lasts 24 hours; lamellae dirty-flesh-colored, adnate to slightly decurrent, not crowded; spores ovoid, pale-flesh-colored, 6-7 X 4-5 4; stipe con- colorous, cartilaginous, tough, fistulose, smooth, often compressed, 5-7 cm. long, 3-5 mm. thick.

Type Locatiry: McGowan’s woods, Ithaca, New York. Hapzrrat: On the ground. DISTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

9. Eccilia pentagonospora Atk. Jour. Myc. 8: 113. 1902.

Pileus umbilicate to infundibuliform, very thin, gregarious, 0.5—-1.5 cm. broad; surface fibrous-striate, smooth or very minutely roughened, mouse-gray to light-gray; lamellae de- current, ascending, not very crowded, flesh-colored, 2-4 mm. broad; spores pink, subquadrate, prominently 4-S-angled, usually 5-angled, 6~10 » in diameter: stipe concolorous, white within, cylindric, even, solid, sometimes with delicate white threads at the base, 2-3 cm. long, 1~2 mm. thick.

TYPE LOCALITY: Ithaca, New York. Hasirat: Oa a lawn. DistRIsutTion:’ Known only from the type locality.

10. Eccilia rhodocylicioides Atk. Jour. Myc. 8: 113. 1902.

Pileus small, convex, umbilicate, gregarious or slightly cespitose, 5-12 mm. broad ; surface mouse-colored, finely floccose-scaly at the center, margin faintly striate, thin; lamellae arcuate, distant, decurrent, bristling with white cystidia under a lens, slightly. paler than the pileus and tinged with flesh-color; spores quadrate to subquadrate, 8~10 4; Stipe cartilaginous, hollow, concolorous except at the apex. where it is paler, 3-5 em. long, 1-2 mm. thick.

TYPE LocALITy: McGowan’s woods, Ithaca, New York. Hasirat: On the ground. DistripuTIon: Known only from the type locality.

11. Eccilia parvula Murrill, sp. nov.

Pileus thin, umbilicate-expanded, solitary, 1 cm. broad; surface dry,

. : : densely fibrillos uniformly grayish-brown, margin incurved, concolorous, s 2

not striate; lamellae conspicuously

Part 2, 1917} AGARICACEAE 83

decurrent, very distant, rather broad, thin, pallid to salmon-colored, undulate and concolorous on the edges; spores subglobose, angular, apiculate, rose-colored, 7-9 u; stipe tapering down- ward, subconcolorous, darker below, glabrous, smooth, 1.5 cm. long, 2 mm. thick.

Type collected on the ground in woods in the New York Botanical Garden, July 8, 1902, F. S. Earle 318 (herb. N. Y. Bot. Gard.). .

DISTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

12. Eccilia pungens Murrill, sp. nov.

Pileus convex, not fully expanding, deeply umbilicate, gregarious, 4-6 cm. broad; surface smooth, glabrous, hygrophanous, avellaneous, somewhat striate with darker lines, margin incurved, concolorous, at first entire, becoming conspicuously lobed or plicate with age; context thin, pallid, with a sweetish, pungent taste and a distinct odor of chloride of lime; lamellae short-decurrent, subdistant, arcuate or plane, many times inserted, white to salmon-colored, entire and concolorous on the edges; spores broadly ellipsoid, angular, apiculate, uniguttulate, rose-colored, 8-10 X 7; stipe equal, compressed, solid, smooth, glabrous, subconcolorous, 4-5 cm. long, 4-5 mm. thick.

Type collected in soil in damp deciduous woods in the New York Botanical Garden, August

10, 1915, W. A. Murvrill (herb. N. Y. Bot. Gard.). DISTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

13. Eccilia Housei Murrill, sp. nov.

Leptonia euchlora House, Bull. N. Y. State Mus. 188: 33. 1917. Not L. euchlora Quél. 1872.

Pileus submembranous, campanulate, becoming deeply depressed at the center, ces- pitose, about 2 cm. broad; surface blackish with a fumosous tint, radiately furrowed and streaked with paler tints, minutely tawny-fibrillose and roughened but scarcely squamulose, margin somewhat irregular; context very thin, pallid; lamellae narrow, decurrent, rather distant, pallid or slightly yellowish when young, soon hecoming salmon-colored; spores ellip- soid, angular, obliquely apiculate, rose-colored, 9-11 X 6-7 4; stipe slender, hollow, grass- green, slightly fibrillose, 2-4 cm. long, 2-3 mm. thick.

Type collected in damp clay soil in deciduous thickets at Green Lake near Kirkville, Onondaga

County, New York, June 6, 1914, H. D. House 14.16 (herb. N. Y. State Mus.). DistR1BurIon: Northern New York.

14. Eccilia fuliginosa Murrill, sp. nov.

Pileus thin, convex-umbilicate, not expanding, gregarious, 2-2.5 cm. broad; surface squamulose, fuliginous, striate, the disk more densely squamulose and nearly black in dried specimens, margin entire, concolorous, incurved; lamellae short-decurrent, subdistant, rather broad, several times inserted, pallid to salmon-colored, fuliginous and floccose on the edges; spores ellipsoid, angular, apiculate, 8-10 X 6-7 »; stipe long and slender, cylindric, glabrous, concolorous, solid, 4-6 cm. long, reaching 2 mm. thick.

Type collected on the ground in wet woods at West Park, New York, August 9, 1903, F. S.

Earle 1838 (herb. N. Y. Bot. Gard.). . DIstTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

15. Eccilia atrides (Lasch) Quél. Champ. Jura Vosg..90. 1872.

Agaricus atrides Lasch, Linnaea 4: 539. 1829.

Pileus subfleshy-membranous, hemispheric to convex, becoming plane, deeply umbilicate, subgregarious, 2.5-3 cm. broad; surface substriate, silky-shining, black or gray, darker and squamulose toward the disk, margin striate; lamellae attenuate, subdecurrent, thin, at length denticulate, subcrowded, pallid, black on the edges; spores broadly ellipsoid, angular, obliquely apiculate, uniguttulate, rose-colored, 8-10 X 7-8 x; stipe subequal, hollow, sub- concolorous, finely black-punctate, especially at the apex, fibrillose at the base, 5-7 cm. long, 2-4 mm. thick.

Type Locality: Germany. ; . Hasrrat: In moist, shady places among mosses or ferns, sometimes on dead wood. DistatsuTIon: New England to North Carolina and west to Michigan; also in Europe.

ILLUSTRATION: Quél. Champ. Jura Vosg. 1. 6, f. 3.

84 NORTH AMERICAN FLORA [VorumME 10

16. Eccilia Watsoni (Peck) Sacc. Syll. Fung. 5: 732. 1887.

Agaricus Watsoni Peck, Ann. Rep. N. Y. State Mus. 28: 48. 1876.

Pileus hemispheric or convex, umbilicate, 1-2 cm. broad; surface striatulate, brown, darker and rough with minute blackish-brown scales on the umbilicus; lamellae distant, arcuate, decurrent, whitish, becoming flesh-colored; spores angular, generally uninucleate, 8.5~10 » in diameter; stipe equal, smooth, shining, brownish or pailid, 2.5 cm. long, 1-2 mm. thick.

Type LocaLiry: Northampton, Fulton County, New York.

Hasirat: On the ground in woods. DIsTRIBUTION: New York and Massachusetts.

17. Eccilia sphagnophila Peck, Ann. Rep. N. Y. State Mus. 54: 147. 1901.

Pileus hemispheric or umbonate-turbinate, 8-16 mm. broad; surface glabrous, dark- brown, striate on the margin; lamellae broad, distant, very decurrent, whitish, becoming slightly tinged with pink; spores angular, 7.5-12.5 X 6-7.5 u; stipe slender, glabrous, con- colorous, 3.5-5 em. long, 1 mm. thick.

Type Locality: Floodwood, New York.

Hasrrat: In marshes among sphagnum.

DISTRIBUTION: New York.

InLusTRATION: Ann. Rep. N. Y. State Mus. 54: pl. I, f. 20-23.

18. Eccilia pyrina (Berk. & Curt.) Sacc. Syll. Fung. 5: 732. 1887. Agaricus pyrinus Berk. & Curt. Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. ITI. 4: 291. 1859.

. Pileus at first broadly convex, expanding, umbilicate, 2.5 cm. broad; surface dark-brown at the center, gray at the crenate margin; context with the odor of ripe pears; lamellae slightly decurrent, whitish; spores irregular, angular; stipe hollow, at length compressed, 4 cm. long. 5-6 mmm. thick.

TYPE LOCALITY: Massachusetts. Hasrrar: In swamps. DIstRIBUTION: Massachusetts.

19, Eccilia californica Murrill, sp. nov.

Pileus convex-umbilicate, not expanding, regular, thin, gregarious, 1.5-2.5 cm. broad; surface dry, smooth, glabrous, uniformly grayish-brown, margin entire, concolorous, inflexed; context grayish-brown, with nutty taste; lamellae decurrent, inserted, broad, crowded, white te salmon-colored, entire and concolorous on the edges; spores broadly ellipsoid, angular, uniguttulate, rose-colored, 8-9 X 74; stipe short, equal or slightly enlarged above, solid, smooth, glabrous, grayish-brown, 1.5-3 cm. long, 1-2 mm. thick.

Type collected among grass in rich ground at Madera Creek, near Stanford Uni i i- fornia, December 21, 1902, James McMurphy 53 (herb. N. Y. Bot. Gard.). re eee aia DISTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

20. Eccilia nigricans Peck, Bull. Torrey Club 22: 201. 1895.

Pileus thin, convex, umbilicate or centrally depressed, 1.5-—3.5 cm. broad; surface sub- zonate, unpolished, finely tomentose, grayish-black; context with the odor and taste of butter- nuts; lamellae broad, distant, decurrent, light-drab or brownish, becoming tinged with flesh- color; spores angular, uninucleate, 10 » long and nearly as broad; stipe short, hollow, grayish- black, usually with abundant white mycelium, about 2.5 cm. long, 1-2 mm, thick.

Type Locatity: Pasadena, California, HasitatT: On grassy ground, DISTRIBUTION: Southern California.

21. Eccilia Yatesii Murrill, sp. nov.

Pileus convex-umbilicate, not expanding, solitary, 2-5 cm. broad; surface smooth, glabrous uniformly dark-lavender, margin entire, concolorous, inflexed; context white ; lamellae de

Parr 2, 1917] AGARICACEAE 85

current, broad, arcuate, distant, pallid to salmon-colored, entire and concolorous on the edges; spores ellipsoid, angular, apiculate, uniguttulate, rose-colored, 8-10 * 7 »; stipe equal, smooth, glabrous, hollow, pale-lavender, 4-6 em. long, 2-5 mm. thick.

Type collected on the ground under redwoods in Muir Woods, near San Francisco, California, January 5, 1914, H. S. Yates 97 (herb. N. Y. Bot. Gard.). DisrrisuTION: Known only from the type locality.

22. Eccilia cubensis Murrill, Mycologia 3: 273. 1911,

Pileus convex, 1 cm. broad; surface dark-tan, darker at the disk, innate-scaly, not striate; lamellae decurrent, rather distant, broad, dirty-white to slightly pinkish; spores octahedral, irregular, 7-9 uw; stipe cylindric, paler than the pileus, slightly granular-floccose, 2 cm. long, 1 mm. thick.

TYPE Locality: Herradura, Cuba.

Hasirat: In a thicket on the bank of a stream. DIsTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

23. Eccilia Earlei Murrill, Mycologia 3: 274. 1911.

Pileus thin, convex-umbilicate, 2 cm. broad; surface pale-tan, fibrillose-scaly, margin thin, substriate; lamellae decurrent, distant, broad, subarcuate, yellow to pinkish; spores irregularly angled, 7-9 4; stipe cylindric, hollow, glabrous, dull-yellow, 4 cm. long, 2 mm. thick.

Type LocaLtity: El Yunque, Cuba. Hastirat: On a dead stick. DISTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

24. Eccilia mexicana Murrill, sp. nov.

Pileus convex to expanded, umbilicate, somewhat irregular, thin, solitary, 3 em. broad; surface dry, glabrous, striate, caesious with an olivaceous tint, margin entire to lobed, lacerate with age, concolorous; lamellae decurrent, arcuate, rather narrow, crowded, white, pallid to salmon-colored, serrulate and blackish on the edges; spores subglobose, angular, uniguttulate, rose-colored, 7—9 4; stipe subequal, tough, compressed, smooth, glabrous, paler blue than the pileus, 3.5 cm. long, 3 mm. thick.

‘Type collected on dead wood in woods at Jalapa, Vera Cruz, Mexico, 1,500 m. elevation, De- cember 12-20, 1909, W. A. & Edna L, Murrill 77 (herb. N. Y. Bot. Gard.). DISTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

25. Eccilia jamaicensis Murrill, Mycologia 3: 274. 1911.

Pileus thin, convex, umbilicate, solitary, nearly 2 cm. broad; surface smooth, glabrous, blackish, margin entire, concolorous; lamellae broad, distant, decurrent, straw-yellow; spores angular, pinkish, 8-10 X 7»; cystidia none; stipe equal. hollow, flattened on drying, carti- laginous, glabrous, ardesiacous, 2 cm. long, 2 mm. thick.

Typk Locality: Chester Vale, Jamaica,

Hasrrat: On decayed wood. . DistRIBution: Known only from the type locality.

DOUBTFUL AND EXCLUDED SPECIES

Eccilia apiculata (Fries) Gill. Champ. Fr. 425. 1876. (Agaricus apiculatus Fries, Epicr. Myc. 159. 1838.) Reported from Massachusetts by Davis.

Eccilia polita (Pers.) Quél. Champ. Jura Vosg. 90. 1872. (Agaricus politus Pers. Syn. Fung. 465. 1801. Not A. politus Bolt. 1783.) Reported from New York by Atkinson and from Ohio by Hard. There are no specimens so determined at Albany.

Eccilia rhodocylix (Lasch) Gill. Champ. Fr. 425. 1876. (Agaricus rhodocylix Tasch, Linnaea 4:542. 1829.) Reported from New York by Peck and also from Cuba and Bermuda, but none of these specimens appear to be the true E. rhodocylix of Europe.

86 NORTH AMERICAN FLORA (VoLumE 10

54, LEPTONIELLA Earle, Bull. N. Y. Bot. Gard. 5: 424. 1909.

Agaricus § Leptonia Fries, Syst. Myc. 1: 201. 1821. : . Leptonia Quél, Champ. Jura Vosg. 88. 1872. Not Leptonium Griff. 1843.

Pileus thin, fleshy, putrescent, usually squamulose and attractively colored, the margin at first incurved; lamellae adnexed or adnate; spores pink or salmon-colored, usually angular; stipe central, slender, tubular, with cartilaginous cortex; veil none.

Type species, Lepionia anatina (Lasch) Quél.

I, SPECIES OCCURRING IN TEMPERATE NorTH AMERICA, EXCEPT THOSE CONFINED TO THE PaciFic COAst Pileus white or whitish, often darker on the disk and sometimes becoming

darker on drying. : . Pileus uniformly white or whitish, not blackening on drying.

Pileus with a small rounded umbo. 1. L. albida, Pileus without an umbo. 2. L. albinella. Pileus white or whitish, darker on the disk. Lamellae denticulate and bluish- black on the edges. 3. L. subserrulata. Lamellae entire and pallid on the edges. 4, L. assularum. Pileus white, becoming blackish on drying. 5. L. transformate. Pileus rosy-isabelline, not striate. 6. L. acericola. Pileus yellowish-brown, conspicuously striate. 7. L. Whiteae, Pileus roseous with brown fibrils, darker on the disk. 8. L. rosea. Pileus uniformly rosy-brown, striate, 1 cm. broad. 9, L. roseibrunnea. Pileus violet-brown, darker on the disk, 12 mm. broad. 10. L. parva. Pileus bluish-green, fading to ashy-green with age. 11. L. aeruginosa. Pileus bluish-brown; lamellae bluish-brown and entire on the edges. 12. L. foliomarginata.

Pileus bluish-black, often becoming grayish-brown with age; lamellae black and serrulate on the edges. Pileus grayish-brown, light-brown, or avellaneous. Stipe greenish-blue. Stipe murinous to plumbeous. Stipe grayish-brown or pallid. Pileus 4 cm. broad; stipe 8 cm. long. . 16. L. Earlei. Pileus 1-3 cm. broad; stipe scarcely reaching 6 cm. long. Pileus convex or plane, not umbilicate. Stipe 2-3 cm. long; species occurring on decayed wood.

w

13. L. columbaria.

_ cS

. L. multicolor. . L. subplacida.

i wm

Surface of pileus glabrous. 17, L. glabra. Surface of pileus squamulose. 18. L. undulatella. Stipe 5 cm. long; species occurring on the ground. 19, L. alabamensis.

Pileus umbilicate or depressed. Surface of pileus striate.

Surface of pileus squamulose, distinctly long-striate. 20. L. longistriata. Surface of pileus glabrous, except on the disk, not distinctly long-striate. 21. L. grisea. Surface of pileus not striate. Pileus deeply umbilicate; stipe uniformly pallid. 22, L. umbilicata. Pileus subumbilicate; stipe pale-violet-gray above and white below. 23. L. validipes.

Pileus dark-brown or blackish-brown, rarely reddish-brown; varying to yellowish-brown in L, strictipes. Stipe 1-4 cm. long.

Stipe white. 24. L. abnormis. Sars Ageronmiabaglie pepe 25. L. hortensis. tipe mouse-gray, becoming blackish on drying. 26. L. cilipes. Stipe brownish or blackish. : Seer Pileus walnut-brown; species occurring on decayed wood. 27. L. seticeps. Pileus blackish-brown; species occurring in grass on lawns. 28. L. Davisiana. Stipe 5-8 cm. long. Pileus hemispheric; species occurring on decayed wood. 29. L. semiglobata. Pileus fiened umbilicate; species occurring in swamps or damp places, Lamellae and stipe pale-lemon-yellow. 30. L. Lamellae and stipe not as above. Sida tad Spores ellipsoid, 10-14 x 7-9 n. 31. L. strictipes. Spores globose, 7~10 yu. 32. L. subvilis. II. Species CONFINED TO THE PACIFIC coast Pileus dark-gray. 33. L. edulis Pileus lilac-black. 34. L. occidentalis Pileus fuliginous. 35. L. fuliginosa. Pileus black. 36. L. nigra.

TI. Species coNFINED To TROPICAL NorTH AMERICA Species occurring on decayed wood.

Part 2, 1917] AGARICACEAE 87

Pileus 2 em. broad. Pileus 5 cm. broad. ete iia Species occurring on the ground. in ; ae roa on ra 39. L. Earlei. ileus livid-purple. ads Pileus murinous or avellaneous. haga Stipe 4-5 cm. long. 41. L. murina. Stipe 2-3 cm. long. Pileus uniformly pale-avellaneous. 42. L. mexicana. Pileus avellaneous with fuliginous disk. 43. L. cinchonensis.

1. Leptoniella albida Murrill, sp. nov.

Pileus hemispheric to convex-expanded, slightly umbilicate or depressed at the center with a little rounded umbo, reaching 2-3 cm. broad; surface finely squamulose, dull or shining, white when young, very light creamy-tan at maturity, margin typically not striate, but some- times with low, distant ridges; context thin, soft, brittle, the taste woody and slightly bitter; lamellae more or less sinuate, sometimes slightly decurrent by a little tooth, about 5 mm. wide near the stipe, not crowded, clear-flesh-colored; spores broadly ellipsoid, irregular, de- cidedly angular, apiculate, rose-colored, 8-9 X 6p ; stipe smooth, finely granular above, con- colorous, tough, distinctly hollow, 3-6.5 cm. long, 1.5-2 mm. thick.

Type collected in sandy soil in deep shade at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, September 12, 191 W. C. Coker 1759 (herb. N. Y. Bot. Gard.). . ia aca a

DISTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

2. Leptoniella albinella (Peck) Murrill. Leptonia albinella Peck, Bull. N. Y. State Mus: 1°: 6. 1888.

Pileus submembranous, subconic or convex, subumbilicate, 1.2-2.5 cm. broad; surface furfuraceous or minutely squamulose, hygrophanous, whitish and striatulate on the margin when moist, white and shining when dry; lamellae narrow, crowded, adnexed, white, becom- ing incarnate; spores angular, 11-12.5 X 7.5-8.5 »; stipe equal, hollow, glabrous or slightly pruinose, whitish, 3.5—5 cm. long, about 2 mm. thick.

- TYPE LOCALITY: Sandlake, New York. Hastirat: In bushy places. DIistRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

3.. Leptoniella subserrulata (Peck) Murrill. Leptonia subserrulata Peck, Ann. Rep. N. Y. State Mus. 51: 288. 1898.

Pileus thin, convex or campanulate, umbilicate, 1.5-3 cm. broad; surface grayish-white, darker colored and squamulose on the umbilicus, margin obscurely striate; lamellae thin, crowded, adnate, at first white, bluish-black and minutely denticulate on the edges; spores irregular or angular, 10-11 X 7.5 u, usually containing a single large nucleus; stipe slender, rather long, hollow, glabrous, whitish or pallid, 5-7.5 cm. long, about 2 mm, thick. .

Typr Locality: Gansevoort, New York. Hasrrat: On low damp ground in woods. DISTRIBUTION: Maine and New York.

4. Leptoniella assularum (Berk. & Curt.) Murrill.

Agaricus assularum Berk. & Curt. Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. III. 4: 290. 1859. Leptonia assularum Sacc. Syll. Fung. 5: 709. 1887.

Pileus campanulate to expanded, umbonate, 4 cm. broad; surface glabrous, virgate, white, darker on the umbo, margin striate; lamellae seceding, white to flesh-colored; spores irregular; stipe flexuous, subequal, fuliginous, 8 cm. long, 3 mm. thick. i.

Typx Locality: South Carolina. Hasrrat: On decayed wood. Distrisution: South Carolina.

5. Leptoniella transformata (Peck) Murrill.

Leptonia transformata Peck, Bull. N. ¥. State Mus. 116: 32. 1907. Pileus thin, submembranous, slightly convex or nearly plane, often umbilicate, 1-2 cm. broad; surface silky-tomentose, dry or slightly moist in wet weather, white, becoming blackish

88 NORTH AMERICAN FLORA [VoLumME 10

or blackish-brown on drying, margin striatulate, at first incurved, sometimes becoming wavy or split when old; context white, the taste farinaceous; lamellae sinuate, adnexed, crowded, unequal, ventricose, white, becoming pink; spores angular, flesh-colored, uninucleate, 10-12.5 X 7.5-8.5 4; stipe long, slender, straight or flexnous,'equal or slightly narrowed upward, priinose at the apex, glabrous and shining at the base, subcartilaginous, stuffed or hollow, white, be- coming blackish or blackish-brown on drying, with white mycelium at the base, 2.5-5 cm. long, 1-2 mm. thick.

TyYPx LocaLity: Falmouth, Massachusetts. Hasrrat: In bushy places. . DIstTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

6. Leptoniella acericola Murrill, sp. nov.

Pileus convex to plane, slightly umbilicate with age, not umbonate, rather thick and firm, gregarious, reaching 5 cm. broad; surface dry, smooth, not striate, rosy-isabelline with a lilac tint, finely marked with darker fascicles of hairs, the older plants more isabelline with fuliginous disk, margin entire, concolorous, incurved when young; context with slightly farina- ceous taste; lamellae adnate, ventricose, subdistant, pure-white to dull-rosy-isabelline, entire and concolorous on the edges; spores ovoid, undulate or very slightly angular in outline, usually apiculate, uniguttulate, rose-colored, 9 X 64; stipe equal in mature specimens, rather short and thick, dry, densely squamulose, bright-steel-blue, fading to subumbrinous with age, 3-4 em. long, 3-4 mm. thick. :

Type collected on the end of a dead sugar maple log in the woods at Lake Placid, Adirondack Mountains, New York, July 17-29, 1912, W. A. & Edna L. Murrill 210 (herb. N. Y. Bot. Gard.). DIstRIBUTION: New York.

7. Leptoniella Whiteae Murrill, sp. nov.

Pileus convex, depressed at the center, solitary, 3 cm. broad; surface hygrophanous, yellowish-brown, conspicuously striate nearly to the center, squamulose, margin concolorous, uneven; context with mild taste; lamellae sinuate, with a slight decurrent tooth, inserted, broad, ventricose, subcrowded, whitish to salmon-colored, concolorous on the edges; spores broadly ellipsoid, angular, usually obliquely apiculate, rose-colored, 12-14 X 8-10 n; stipe equal, rather slender, glabrous, shining, yellowish, cartilaginous, hollow, whitish-mycelioid at the base, 5-6 cm. long, 2-3 mm. thick.

Type collected on much decayed wood in leaf-mold at Bar Harbor, Maine, August 12, 1901, V. S. White 99 (herb. N. Y. Bot. Gard.). DIsTRiBuTion: Known only from the type locality.

8. Leptoniella rosea (Longyear) Murrill. Leptonia rosea Longyear, Trans. Mich. Acad. Sci. 3: 59. 1902.

Pileus thin, convex, obtuse and depressed on the disk, 3-3.5 cm. broad; surface roseous, with brown fibrils, darker on the disk, margin not striate; lamellae adnate with a slight tooth, not crowded, 6 mm. broad, whitish, becoming flesh-colored; spores angular, flesh-colored, 10-12 X 7-8; stipe slender, smooth, roseous, cartilaginous, stuffed, slightly thickened at the apex and base, whitish-mycelioid at the base, 7-8 cm. long.

TYPE LOCALITY: Kent County, Michigan. Hasrrat: In burnt soil on a sandy hillside. DISTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality. ILLUSTRATION: Trans. Mich, Acad. Sci. 3: f. 5.

9. Leptoniella roseibrunnea Murrill, sp. nov.

Pileus rather thick, convex-umbilicate, solitary, 1 em. broad; surface moist, hygrophanous, uniformly rosy-brown, striate, margin entire, concolorous ; lamellae adnate, very broad, distant, inserted, entire on the edges, salmon-colored; spores ellipsoid, angular, obliquely apiculate, uniguttulate, rose-colored, 7-8.5 X 5 4; stipe very slender, equal, smooth, glabrous, brown, about 4 cm. long and 1 mm. thick.

Type collected on the ground in hemlock woods in the New York Botani J 28, 1911, W. A. Murrill (herb. N. Y. Bot. Gard), hee een aneaaet DistRisution: Known only from the type locality.

Part 2, 1917] AGARICACEAE 89

10. Leptoniella parva (Peck) Murrill. Leptonia parva Peck, Ann. Rep. N. Y. State Mus. 45: 78 (18). 1893.

Pileus thin, convex or nearly plane, umbilicate, about 12 mm. broad; surface slightly radiate-striate, violaceous-brown, darker and squamulose on the umbilicus; lamellae sub- distant, adnate, whitish tinged with flesh-color; spores irregular or angular, uninucleate, about 7.5 X 6 yu; stipe slender, glabrous, solid, concolorous, about 2.5 cm. long, scarcely 2 mm. thick.

Tyre LocaLity: Lake Pleasant, Hamilton County, New York. Hasirat: In woods. DIstRIBUTION: Maine and northern New York.

11. Leptoniella aeruginosa (Peck) Murrill. Lepionia aeruginosa Peck, Bull. Torrey Club 26: 65. 1899.

Pileus thin, convex, umbilicate or centrally depressed, 1.5~2.5 em. broad; surface striate, aeruginous, fading with age to an ashy-green hue; lamellae broad, subdistant, adnate, aeru- ginous, tinged with flesh-color when mature; spores angular, 7.5-10 » long, usually containing a single large nucleus; stipe slender, glabrous, hollow, concolorous, about 2.5 cm. long and 2 mm. thick.

‘TYPE LocaLity: Oxbow River, Canada. Hasirat: In shaded places in woods. DIsTRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

12. Leptoniella foliomarginata (Peck) Murrill.

Agaricus foliomarginatus Peck, Bull. Buffalo Soc. Nat. Sci. 1: 49. 1873. Agaricus marginatus Peck, Ann. Rep. N. Y. State Mus. 26: 56. 1874. Leptonia marginaia Sacc. Syll. Fung. 5: 710. 1887.

Pileus convex, umbilicate, 2.5-5 cm. broad; surface bluish-brown, scabrous and a little darker on the disk; lamellae broad, subdistant, plane, whitish, becoming flesh-colored, the edges entire and colored like the pileus; stipe smooth, equal, concolorous, solid at the base, with a small cavity at the apex, 1.2-2 cm. long, 1 mm. thick.

TYPE Locality: Maryland, New York. HasitaTt: On the ground and on decaying wood in groves. DistRIBUTION: Known only from the type locality.

13. Leptoniella columbaria (Bull.) Murrill.

Agaricus columbarius Bull. Herb. Fr. pl. 413, f. 1. 1788. Agaricus serrula Pers. Syn. Fung. 463. 1801.

Agaricus serrulatus Fries, Syst. Myc. 1: 204.